As Violence Spreads in Bahrain, Ambassador Breaks Silence

By Sarah Breger Disheartening news from Bahrain this weekend, as clashes between armed forces and anti-government protesters left 800 wounded. Yesterday, demonstrators blocked roads to Manama’s financial center and around the city’s university. Police used tear gas, batons and rubber bullets to disperse the crowds, according to witnesses.  Bahrain’s ambassador to the U.S. Houda Nonoo released a statement—among her first since the protests erupted last month—saying protesters attacked police with Molotov cocktails and sharp utensils, injuring many policeman.  On Friday, Nonoo gave her first public statement since the protests began. She said law enforcement has dealt in an  “appropriate manner” with the situation  and that their self-discipline “ensured that there was no serious impact on the social fabric of Bahrain from a large-scale sectarian confrontation” The...

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Let My People Vote!

By Steven Philp Egypt may lack a president, but it is not bereft of direction. Meeting two primary demands of pro-democracy protestors, Egyptian military leaders have dissolved the parliament, suspended the constitution and set a schedule for drafting a new one ahead of September elections. As the Washington Post details, this is one of the first steps towards civilian rule following the resignation of authoritarian leader Hosni Mubarak. The ruling council has communicated that these changes will remain in effect for six months until presidential and parliamentary elections can occur. In the meantime a committee is being formed to amend the constitution, and provide a vehicle for popular referendum to approve these changes. What is remarkable about these changes is their genesis within the citizens of Egypt. As noted by columnist and author Thomas L. Friedman, one...

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