Biden and Netanyahu are shown shaking hands as Trump looks on.

Adjusting to a New Political World

For some, the transition was swift and painless.

On the streets next to Capitol Hill, DC residents broke out into spontaneous dancing, as soon as police lifted the barricades next to their homes at the end of Joe Biden’s inauguration ceremony.  

Across the country, cheerful Americans posted photos online of champagne bottles popping open, sharing toasts with friends, and showing off Biden-Harris posters and inauguration memorabilia. (There were also the Bernie Sanders memes, but that’s another story.)

For others, however, transitioning to Joe Biden’s America was harder.

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Moment Zoominar: What to Do About Anti-Semitism & Racism with Eric K. Ward

Eric K. Ward, an internationally known expert on the intersection of white nationalism with anti-Semitism, is in conversation with Moment editor-in-chief Nadine Epstein about how anti-Semitism is at the core of white nationalism—and how combatting anti-Semitism is the most efficient way of fighting white nationalism. They discuss the anti-Semitism evident in the recent attack on the U.S. Capitol, the relationship between authoritarianism and white nationalism, racism, Black Lives Matter and more.

This event is a tribute to the memory of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., whose work inspired Ward in his lifelong pursuit of Civil Rights, hosted by Moment Magazine with the support of the Joyce and Irving Goldman Family Foundation.

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Yiddish storytelling

Moment Zoominar: Yiddish Storytelling for a New Generation

Yiddish has a rich legacy of storytelling for children, including both global classics and works that originated in the mother tongue of Ashkenazi Jewry. Join Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone translator Arun Viswanath and Miriam Udel, editor and translator of Honey on the Page: A Treasury of Yiddish Children’s Literature for a wide-ranging conversation with Moment Deputy Editor Sarah Breger about how they are helping to bring the legacy of Yiddish into the twentieth century, their work in relation to broad developments in Jewish history and how it intersects with their own family narratives.

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